hsifeng: (Garden)

For those in the *central* Central Valley of CA who are interested in using converted raisin sweat boxes as planting beds, the following contact information is for you!

 

UC Master Gardner Pete Susvoe sells these boxes from his home in Sanger. Pete’s contact number is 559-846-7565 If you live nearby, you may be able to arrange for him to drop off the boxes. Otherwise you will need to arrange to pick them up at his location. The UC Master Gardeners also have three of these boxes for sale at ‘the Garden of the Sun’ here in Fresno. Their contact phone number is 456 4151.

 

I believe both sources sell the boxes for $6-$8/each.

hsifeng: (Food!)

Just making a note of this site and giving a "shout-out" to all my garden homies: If you like to plant stuff, you might want to join this lovely community! They have a lot of great groups including the "Food Preservation Station", "Compost Nuts" and "Homesteading Newbies" as well as blog spots, chat forums, etc.

They are still under construction, but it has been nice to get that 'project high' off of other people gardens and to get inspired to try new things!

BTW - Anyone out there have an old fruit and vegetable dehydrator that they aren't using and want to give to a good home?

Edit: Have I mentioned that I *love* this site for inspiration yet? Someone mentioned that LA has a "free mulch" program through the city on the "Square Foot" gardening board. So I called up the City of F to see if we had a program too: The short answer is, "No." The long answer is, West Coast Green Waste (497-5320, 3077 S Golden State Frontage Rd.) takes the City of F green waste bin contents and makes mulch from them. Then they sell that mulch at $50 for 2 cubic yards (a good amount of mulch!). It's also possible to get compost via Gallo Wineries here in town (458-2565, Clovis and Olive Avenues behind the winery. Open 7-4 M-Sat, closed from 12-12:30 for lunch) for $14/cubic yard.

Once I get my hay bales together enough to be able to set up a little composting center, I am going to have to hit these places up for raw materials.

Edit 3/17/08: More lovely links from Freedomgarden.org, specifically the "Compost Nuts!" board. I want me some wormies once the rest of the compost materials are set up in the side yard. I think a set-up like this will work out quite well as an addition to the growing "compost station".

Edit 3/18/09: Per the online F.A. (Farmers Almanac) - "Start some vegetables in flats now: Brussel sprouts, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, peppers, eggplants, tomatoes, and lettuce are good choices." Perhaps I will have to start som peppers and eggplant seeds this weekend as well as the lettuse.

Seeds...

Mar. 15th, 2009 08:02 pm
hsifeng: (Food!)
So garden sprites, what lovely heirloom seeds should we try out? I am interested in trying to find some types that might be historically "accurate" for us... *grin*

Edit 3/16/09:  Found my old list of "historic foods" from the RWA workshop I ran last year. Now, to figure out what modern varieties might "relate" to these historic ones...

 

Vegetable greens (Wortes): cabbage, Swiss chard, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, broccoli, chicory, endive, radicchio, spinach, sorrel, watercress, lamb's lettuce, dandelion, nettles, rocket, mustard greens, turnip greens, beet greens.

Roots: rapes (turnips) - the staple, salsify, radish, celery root, pasturnakes (carrots and parsnips), skyrwates/skirrits (water parsnip), scallions, onions, garlic, leeks.

Beans and Peas: peas, split peas, white beans, fava beans (broad beans), lentils, chickpeas (garbanzos).

Stalks and Vegetable Fruits: asparagus, celery, fennel, mushrooms, marrows/gourds (mostly varieties we would call summer squash and zucchini), cucumber, eggplant, artichoke, olives.

Grains: wheat, oats, barley, rye, buckwheat, rice, millet, spelt.

Fruit: apple, crabapple, pear, quince (very common), cherry, peach, apricot, nectarine, damson (plum) and prune, fig, date, pomegranate, orange, lemon, grapes, raisins, melon (such as honeydew and muskmelon/canteloupe), rhubarb, strawberry, currants (very common), gooseberry, bilberry, wild blackberries (but not cultivated), mulberries.

Nuts: almonds (a staple), filberts (hazelnuts), chestnuts, walnuts, acorns, sesame seeds, pistachios, pinenuts.

 

Anyone know what (if anything) they plant in the Kentwell gardens? I know that Monticello has a terrific historic garden, but that is at least partly because Thomas Jefferson's big thing was farming.

 

"Those who labor in the earth are the chosen people of God, if ever He had a chosen people, whose breasts He has made his peculiar deposit for substantial and genuine virtue."—Thomas Jefferson, Notes on Virginia, 1785


Found my old list of "historic foods" from the RWA workshop I ran last year. Now, to figure out what modern varieties might "relate" to these... Anyone know what (if anything) they plant in the Kentwell gardens? I know that Montechello has a terrific historic garden, but that is at least partly because Thomas Jefferson's big thing was farming.
hsifeng: (Food!)

I got this great video demo on how to make your newspaper seedling pots cheap and easy from [livejournal.com profile] vanderbruegghen 


How to Create Seed-Starting Pots From Newspapers -- powered by eHow.com
hsifeng: (Food!)

Thinking more about getting the garden up and going, now that I have spent a weekend on J&T's spread. I want to start gathering the following items so that I can get the seedlings started soon - the weather is crazy warm, and I think we can manage a cold frame on the planting table for the seed starts if we get going on gathering the materials.

Plastic gallon milk jugs

Newspaper – black and white print only!
Cardboard egg cartons
Thick, clear plastic tarping
Soil/Compost - I've got some, but I need more!
Seeds

I just requested information from J&T on the cost of making this little item (since he is a woodworker and a lathe specialist).

I am going to start tagging garden posts by month so that I can use them for future reference as the work on the plot continues over the years.

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